Black-Owned Brands & Creators You Should Know About

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February is Black History month! There are so many incredible Black-owned brands, businesses, creators, and educators within our community. We had the chance to chat with a few of these brands & creators to learn more about their stories and journeys. Here’s what they shared with us and how you can support them this month and beyond.

Briana, Sun & Lace

When did you start your business?

I started Sun & Lace in the summer of 2015.

What inspired you to start your business, and how was it born?

After not finding baby boy shoes for my son that fit my aesthetic and need for quality, I made him some! I’ve enjoyed sewing since I was about 10, when I got my first sewing machine, so sewing something for him was just natural.

Tell us about what you do/what you make. 

My team and I handcraft leather baby shoes and accessories from high-quality leather. All Sun & Lace items are made in our Wisconsin studio, which also has a little storefront from which local customers can see where our products are made. 

What accomplishment are you most proud of to date?

I’m most humbled and proud of the fact that customers choose the little shoes we make to be a little part of their lives. Our shoes have been a part of big life events, and I’m so honored! 

What are some other Black-owned businesses, black artists, and/or creators that you love to support?

Patricia, Anzhelika Crochet

When did you start your business?

I started Anzhelika Crochet in 2010.

What inspired you to start your business, and how was it born?

I was inspired during a baby shower my family threw to welcome my little cousin Sabine. Everyone was thrilled to see the baby wear I made for her. I started crocheting as a hobby, and sewing came as a result of hiding in my mother’s sewing studio to avoid doing my chores. My grandmother started teaching me how to sew and the rest is history. 

Tell us about what you do/what you make. 

Anzhelika Crochet is children's wear with a unique twist of fun prints, African prints with handmade crochet. I also make crochet accessories for the whole family such as earrings, hats, mittens, scarves, sweaters, and I even crochet hats and sweaters for dogs and cats.

What accomplishment are you most proud of to date?

I am most proud that I was featured in the AMINA Magazine March 2016 issue. I grew up reading that fashion magazine. I was very intrigued with the fashion and the artists since they were mostly black women. When I was contacted to be a part of it; I was proud of myself for accomplishing one of my childhood dreams. 

What are some other Black-owned businesses, black artists, and/or creators that you love to support?

I love to support @LiPaSabyMNK, @delalicosmetics, @teddysarts, @brownbabesreptoo just to name a few.

Valerie Thompkins, Author of Girls Like Me

When and how did the idea of Girls Like Me come about? 

I was inspired to write Girls Like Me because I did not see many brown-skinned children represented in the books I read growing up, especially not in main character roles. 

What inspired you to write it?

Only 12 percent of children’s books include brown children, and I wanted to provide a tool to introduce the careers that kids could aspire to pursue as adults. I created a book with a brown-skinned, curly-haired doctor on the cover because representation matters!

What's your favorite part of Girls Like Me — a phrase, an illustration, etc?

“May you never stop dreaming, the limit does not exist.” I am also a huge fan of the pilot illustration, I think she's just the coolest! 

Tell us about how you started writing?

I started as an avid reader. I have always loved to read and naturally became skilled in writing. I majored in Communications in Undergrad because I could not abandon my interest in writing. I began writing resumes and cover letters professionally first, however, it was not until October 2020 that I began writing my first book and drafted the manuscript for Girls Like Me. 

What accomplishment are you most proud of to date?

I am proud to have impacted thousands of children through my book, and millions of people through my social media. It warms my heart when moms share they could not find any brown-skinned book covers in the mainstream bookstores, and Girls Like Me is the exact type of book they seek out for their daughters. This book cover with a curly-haired, browned skinned doctor illustrates that natural hair is indeed professional and beautiful. 

What are some other Black-owned businesses, black artists, and/or creators that you love to support? 

  • Kierra Jones, an educator and new bookstore owner in Dallas, Texas - @teachingbusybees

A handful of additional Black-owned businesses we love are: @harperiman, @puzzlehuddle, @prettypleaseteethers, and @browntoybox.

We’re always looking for more brands to support & share with our community, so please comment below any Black-owned businesses, brands, and creators you love.


Although February will come to an end, our community’s support for Black-owned businesses and creators should continue far beyond this month. We all must listen to and learn about Black stories and experiences because Black History is all of our histories.


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